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Imaging Hallmarks of Cancer - 18-19 October 2018

The European School of Radiology (ESOR) Symposium on Imaging Hallmarks of Cancer takes place at the Champalimaud Foundation on 18 - 19 October 2018. Professor Patrick Bossuyt is one of the keynote speakers, giving a presentation entitled “Changes in the evaluation of medical tests: from results to consequences.”

  1. 30.5.2018

    The European School of Radiology (ESOR) Symposium on Imaging Hallmarks of Cancer takes place at the Champalimaud Foundation on 18 - 19 October 2018. Professor Patrick Bossuyt is one of the keynote speakers, giving a presentation entitled “Changes in the evaluation of medical tests: from results to consequences.” Prof. Bossuyt was kind enough to provide some information about his background and the content of his lecture.

    Patrick Bossuyt is the professor of Clinical Epidemiology at the Academic Medical Center of the University of Amsterdam, where he leads the Biomarker and Test Evaluation Research program. The BiTE Program aims to appraise and develop methods for evaluating medical tests and biomarkers, and to apply these methods in relevant clinical studies. In doing so, the program wants to strengthen the evidence-base for rational decision-making about the use of tests and testing strategies in health care. Prof. Bossuyt spearheaded the STARD initiative for the improved reporting of diagnostic test accuracy studies.

    Professor Patrick Bossuyt: “Like all other interventions in health care, medical tests should be thoroughly evaluated before they are introduced into daily clinical practice. There should be sound evidence to support the recommendations about testing in clinical practice guidelines, to provide coverage through reimbursement decisions, or to invest in testing technology at the hospital level.

    For a very long time, tests have been introduced based on a generic promise that new technology will improve things. Increasingly, there is shift towards patient outcomes in the appraisal of health care interventions. In more and more countries reimbursement decisions are guided by considerations about effectiveness and cost-effectiveness: will these interventions improve the health of patients and other citizens, or simplify health care while not affecting quality? 

    We argue that the evaluation of imaging and other medical tests cannot and should not escape from this consequentialist transition. Yet accepting this transition poses specific challenges, as trials that document the effects of testing on patient outcomes are relatively few in number in most areas of clinical medicine. The reasons for this evidence gap, and solutions for overcoming it, will be discussed.”

    More information and details about how to register for FREE to attend the Symposium are available on ESOR's webpage.




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